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Old August 31st @ 11:32 am   #1
RisingPhoenix's Avatar
 
From: Las Vegas

Motorcycle: CBR 1000rr/600f4i
Hello guys

I need some info on how to replace my Cam Chain Tensioner. I have a 2002 Honda F4i and instead of buying the replacment automatic CCT, I purchased the Manual CCT from APE http://cbrzone.com/sprockets.html Everyone has told me how easy they are to install, but my mechanical ability is very limited. I've found a few forum posts about how to change it, but most of the time the post is for a bike that is much older than mine or a different brand than honda. Can somebody please post some very idiot proof instructions on how to change it for me?

NOTE: I will not give sexual favors for advice no matter how many times you offer it Gleno.

 
 
Old August 31st @ 12:00 pm   #2
BrightAngel's Avatar
 
Since I found this, I thought I'd post it up on this thread for anyone who might be looking for the info...600cc ZX6R Valve Adjustment and Other Crap

But, at this site I found a tutorial that I copied below, however it is lacking photos.* Maybe a service manual?
This doesn't specifically say the model/year, but the guy who posted it has an F4i so I can only assume.... and maybe they don't differ too much from year to year?

Replaced CCT Myself in 3 Hours
This is posted and published by the none other then our old friend Murph. He gave me permission to add it to our site. Thanks Murph*

Got the new J22 part and did the replacement myself. It wasn't terribly difficult and took about 3 hours to do (of course, I was doing a lot of cleaning and whatnot with the fairings off, so I took my sweet time).

If anyone is interested in doing it yourself, I'll outline the steps. Sorry for the lack of photos, but I'll try to paint the picture as best I can with words only.

1. Drain the fuel. I did it by siphon -- nothing fancy.

2. Remove the ram-air covers. This is fairly simple, only two screws holding them on, one at the front of the cover, and toward the rear near the gas tank.

3. Remove the seat (two bolts under the rear corners)-- it makes it easier to deal with the gas tank in the next step.

4. Unbolt the two head bolts that hold the gas tank in place. Also, undo the two rear bolts that hold down the seat mount and the rear of the gas tank. You should now be able to pivot the front of the tank up on its rear mount. Put something in there to hold the tank up so that you can undo the hoses underneath.

5. There are several hoses to undo in order to remove the tank completely. Undo the clipped hoses and make a note of where they go (if memory serves correctly, there are 3). Undo the main fuel-feed hose from where it attaches to the throttle body. Careful as you'll have whatever remaining fuel leak out, and it may first come out under a little pressure, so watch your eyes. There is also the overflow hose which I just left attached to the tank and pulled the whole thing out.

6. Remove the tank from the bike. You should now be looking at the top of the airbox.

7. Remove the TOP portion of the airbox by unscrewing the screws that go around its perimeter. There is also one screw smack in the center. In doing this, you'll remove the rubber flaps also -- note how the screws and washers are oriented on these things. There are three screws in each flap.

8. You should now be looking at your air filter and intake ports. Remove the filter then unscrew and remove the ports. If my memory is correct, the bottom portion of the airbox should come off now. I can't remember if there are screws other than the ones that hold the ports down. If there are, it should be fairly obvious. There are several hoses under the airbox and one hose/sensor combination. You can unscrew the sensor module from the bottom of the airbox and leave it and its hose attached and in the bike. Detach the other hoses and note where they attach to the airbox. Remove the base of the airbox from the bike.

9. Now, you should be looking at the throttle body in all its glory. The CCT is located on the rear-right side of the engine head (in relation to you sitting on the bike). You should be able to see it just underneath the fuel-cage that you disconnected the main fuel line from in step 5.

10. Despite popular belief, you do NOT have to remove the throttle body! This would be a nightmare! Using a stubby-phillips driver, unscrew the screw that is in the end/top of the CCT tower. Use the little tool that came with your new CCT (looks like a flat piece of metal in the shape of a "T") to untension the tensioner and lock it down. Practice on your new CCT to see how this works.

11. If you have a small swivel-head ratchet with allen/hex sockets, that should work fine for getting at the CCT mounting bolts. It will take a little contortionist styling, but you should be able to get at them. Be patient and persistent. It also helps if you've removed the right-side fairing as you can squeeze a finger in near the base of the CCT that way to help guide your tool into place.

12. Remove the CCT. Be careful that you have the CCT tensioner tool locked into place so the tensioning piston doesn't just explode out to the stop once you begin pulling out the mechanism. Honda warns that you could damage your cam chain if your not careful, but I think it would take some serious oafishness on your part to do that. Also make a note of the gasket between the CCT and engine. Make sure it comes out with the CCT. If not, you'll have a little cleaning to do. If you have to clean, make sure you remove ALL of the gasket from the engine side and don't score/damage the metal.

13. Take the tensioner tool out of the old CCT and use it to wind down the new CCT and lock it into place.

14. Install the new CCT. Make sure the gasket on the new CCT is in good condition. Snug down the two mounting bolts and then unlock the tensioner tool. I let it rotate slowly in my hand so that it didn't just RAM the tensioner plate inside. Once it's stopped turning, remove the tool completely and use the screw that you took out of the top of your old CCT to seal the hole.

15. Reassemble the bike in reverse of how you disassembled it. Most of it can't go together the wrong way, so it should be fairly easy. Watch your fuel hoses and make sure your connections are snug.

That's it! Attempt this at your own risk! (In other words, don't come yelling at me if you f*ck up your bike.) I hope this helps!
 
 
Old August 31st @ 02:56 pm   #3
sinfulf4i
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RisingPhoenix
Hello guys

I need some info on how to replace my Cam Chain Tensioner.* I have a 2002 Honda F4i and instead of buying the replacment automatic CCT, I purchased the Manual CCT from APE http://cbrzone.com/sprockets.html* Everyone has told me how easy they are to install, but my mechanical ability is very limited.* I've found a few forum posts about how to change it, but most of the time the post is for a bike that is much older than mine or a different brand than honda.* Can somebody please post some very idiot proof instructions on how to change it for me?*

NOTE:* I will not give sexual favors for advice no matter how many times you offer it Gleno.
if you give me a few days ill yank my f4i apart and post pics for you on how to install it or try http://www.bossturbo.com/cbr/howto_cct.shtml
 
 
Old August 31st @ 03:55 pm   #4
RisingPhoenix's Avatar
 
From: Las Vegas

Motorcycle: CBR 1000rr/600f4i
Yeah i've looked at that site before, but the instructions are on a 2000 f4, and i've heard the cct is in a different place on the f4i's.
 
 
Old August 31st @ 05:23 pm   #5
sinfulf4i
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RisingPhoenix
Yeah i've looked at that site before, but the instructions are on a 2000 f4, and i've heard the cct is in a different place on the f4i's.
nope same motor just added fuel injection
 
 
Old August 31st @ 07:16 pm   #6
f4xpres's Avatar
 
From: WEST SIDE

Motorcycle: 06 CBR1000RR
I've changed mine and the only hard part is getting a wrench or socket so squeeze in there.. Its a tight fit..
 
 

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